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KENANJI BROWN CONFIRMED AS FIRST BLACK WOMAN ON US SUPREME COURT

KENANJI BROWN CONFIRMED AS FIRST BLACK WOMAN ON US SUPREME COURT

President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris celebrated the historic confirmation of Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson to the Supreme Court, calling it “moment of real change in American history.”

In her remarks, Vice President Kamala Harris said the country’s first president, George Washington, “once referred to America as a great experiment, a nation founded on the previously untested belief that the people we, the people could form a more perfect union.”

“And it is that belief that we reaffirmed yesterday, through the confirmation of the first Black woman to the United States Supreme Court. And Judge Jackson, you will inspire generations of leaders,” she said.

Biden said the historic moment “is going to let so much sun shine on so many young women, Black women and many minorities.”

The president praised Jackson’s “incredible character and integrity” during the confirmation process, saying she put up with “verbal abuse, the anger, constant interruptions, the most vile baseless assertions and accusations.”

He also commended Maine Sen. Susan Collins, Alaska Sen. Lisa Murkowski and Utah Sen. Mitt Romney for backing her at the court

Jackson will be the high court’s first former public defender with the elite legal background of other justices as well. She has degrees from Harvard and Harvard Law School and held top clerkships, including for Breyer himself.

Jackson will take the bench later this year, filling the shoes of retiring Justice Stephen Breyer.

Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson said on  Friday her confirmation as the first Black woman to the Supreme Court showed the progress of America, declaring, ″We’ve made it – all of us.”

Jackson delivered emotional remarks, after the Senate approved her nomination, saying, it was a moment the entire country could be proud of.

“We have come a long way toward perfecting our union,” she said. “In my family, it took just one generation to go from segregation to the Supreme Court of the United States.”

She added: “It has taken 232 years and 115 prior appointments for a Black woman to be selected to serve on the Supreme Court of the United States. But we’ve made it. We’ve made it, all of us.”

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